Louis Bacon

Nygard fabricated insider trading and Ku Klux Klan allegations against Louis Bacon

Two videos allegedly fabricated to include billionaire Louis Bacon’s name in news stories dealing with insider trading and the Ku Klux Klan have been submitted to a Manhattan judge in an appeal to have a high-profile defamation case tried in New York rather than The Bahamas, according to the Tribune.

 

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Nassau Guardian: Nygard paid for ads against Louis Bacon

The saga continues in the Bahamas between billionaires Bacon and Nygard.

According to an apology published in the Nassau Guardian (pictured), Bahamas-resident Peter Nygard’s Nygard International Partnership paid for adverts to be featured in the newspaper that made unsubstantiated claims against his neighbor and fellow billionaire Louis Bacon.

This appears to be connected to recent revelations apparently evidencing Nygard’s involvement in a bizarre online harassment campaign against Bacon.

The full text reads:

We wish to apologise to Mr. Louis Bacon for certain statements contained in two (2) adverts published in our newspaper on the 29th January, 2016 and 22nd February, 2016.

The adverts in question were paid for by Nygard International Partnership and contained in “wrap arounds”. Both of the adverts could have been understood as suggesting that Mr. Bacon had spread a false story to Lyford Cay Residents that Mr. Peter Nygard was planning to build a Stem Cell Clinic at Nygard Cay in order to mislead the Court into granting injunctions against Mr. Nygard. The truth is we were not provided with any evidence to substantiate such claims against Mr. Bacon, nor are we aware of any, and it was certainly not our intention to give any such impression.

We therefore apologise to Mr. Bacon and his family for publishing the aforementioned adverts as worded. We shall exercise more care in the future.

 

Peter Nygard fabricates news clips in ‘smoking gun’ video

The Bahamian billionaire battle continues, so let’s go to the video.

That’s the charge brought by hedge fund titan Louis Bacon in submitting his appeal to have his defamation suit against Peter Nygard tried in New York.

The “smoking-gun video,” as described by Bacon’s defense, which previously was under seal, captures fashion-mogul Nygard observing what two off-screen voices call “fabricated” news clips that cast Bacon, a hedge-fund tycoon, in a maliciously bad light.

The video shows Nygard eating and drinking on a hotel bed with a younger woman while passing judgment on the fabricated news clips. The fabricated clips can be heard but not seen on the video, which Bacon’s legal team obtained through discovery for the trial.

One of the clips includes CBS footage on the insider-trading arrest of Rajat Gupta, only it has been doctored to swap in Moore in place of Gupta.

Similarly, in an ABC report “Inside the New Ku Klux Klan,” footage of Moore has been edited into the piece immediately after correspondent Cynthia McFadden ends her lead-in with: “It may surprise you who’s among their ranks.”

“We were gonna’ go further, but we’re not sure how far to take it,” says one of the off-screen voices, believed to be his son Jessar, who’s seeking instruction from Nygard.

“That’s not far,” he responds.

But Nygard warms up to the doctored footage, calling it “good stuff” near the end of the six-minute video.

And when an off-screen voice admits, “It’s pretty dirty,” Nygard agrees: “Pretty dirty.”

The sound track for the fabricated clips is consistent with a video currently available on YouTube, entitled “Is Louis Bacon Racist?”

That video was supposedly uploaded by a Vincent Roy, but one of its creators said in a deposition that its editing was done “at Peter Nygard’s instruction.”

A spokesman for Nygard said the fashion mogul did not know he was being video taped while watching and commenting on the fabricated news clips.

Watch the Video

Louis Bacon’s Moore Bahamas Foundation donates $250,000 for Hurricane Relief

Louis Bacon’s Moore Bahamas Foundation has announced a $250,000 donation toward the relief efforts and rebuilding needed after Hurricane Joaquin.

“The Bahamas are like a second home to me and my family,” said Louis Bacon. “We were saddened to learn of the devastation caused by Hurricane Joaquin in the southern islands. Having spent a great deal of time in these beautiful islands sailing, fishing and diving, my heart goes out to those families who live and labor in the Bahamas more remote islands, close to nature but most vulnerable. We pray that necessary aid gets to these islanders quickly and helps them in building back their lives, homes and communities.”

The Moore Bahamas Foundation, the Bahamas affiliate of The Moore Charitable Foundation founded by Louis Bacon in 1992, seeks to promote environmental education in the diverse ecosystems of The Bahamas. It aims to improve and preserve Bahamian land and water along with its inhabitants. The foundation is particularly focused on maintaining sustainable conch fishery and the Nassau Grouper.

Louis Bacon Honored with Foreign Policy Association Medal

The Foreign Policy Association (FPA) held its annual dinner on May 21, 2015 where it presented three distinguished honorees with the Foreign Policy Association Medal, including Louis Bacon, Founder, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Moore Capital Management, LP and President of The Moore Charitable Foundation, Inc.; Lee C. Bollinger, President, Columbia University; and Alan Gilbert, Music Director, New York Philharmonic. Additionally, Claudio Descalzi, Chief Executive Officer, Eni Spa was presented with FPA’s Corporate Social Responsibility Award.

The Foreign Policy Association Medal recognizes individuals demonstrating responsible internationalism and who are working to expand public knowledge of international affairs.

Past recipients include the Honorable Michael Bloomberg, Mayor, New York City; Timothy Geithner, Chairman, Federal Reserve Bank of New York; and Kevin Rudd, Prime Minister, Australia.

Legendary NBC Nightly News anchor Tom Brokaw introduced honoree Louis Bacon, commending Bacon’s stewardship on climate change: “There are two fundamental concepts we should keep in mind – to be proactive citizens in our own country, and to be global citizens. I can’t think of anyone of his generation who has that in his every waking moment than the man we are here to honor – Louis Bacon.” Brokaw added, “I am so reassured to know that he is taking his place in the forefront of this extraordinarily important challenge.”

Upon receiving the Foreign Policy Association Medal, Louis Bacon commented, “I wish to thank the FPA for this great honor. Our Foundation is privileged to support great environmental causes and join in conservation activist campaigns.”

Tom Brokaw. Photo credit: Mark Von Holden

Bacon continued, “Our commitment spans across North America and internationally. In particular, we have supported conservation efforts to save threatened land and marine areas in the Bahamas – a place I care deeply about and which has felt like my second home over the last twenty-five years.”

A longtime conservationist dedicated to the preservation of coastal and marine habitats, Bacon commended the Bahamian government for its great progress in the conservation of natural resources and urged more action to ensure proper governance and regulation, “We are supporting local efforts to adopt a comprehensive environmental safety net with an Environmental Protection Act as well as a Freedom of Information Act. Without such legislation, environmentalists are unable to hold accountable those responsible for the common occurrence of oil spills fouling waters and developers destroying the precious coral reefs.”

As the principal public forum in New York City for foreign policy addresses, the FPA attracts broad national and international attention. Through its annual meetings program and World Leadership Forum, the FPA gives members access to discussion and debate on the most critical issues facing America today.

Honoree Lee C. Bollinger said, “The world has changed, just in the past decade, in ways that are just as significant in the post WWII era. The main changes driving it are the issues to be addressed – we can no longer leave climate change or global economic governance simply to countries to solve. Every university has to have some alignment with the outside world and has a significant role to address issues in the unique way we do. As a global university, hopefully Columbia University can be the home for that broader effort.”

With support from The Moore Charitable Foundation, the FPA has also convened a Task Force on Climate Change to make recommendations for a North American strategy to abate global warming and make climate change a priority for U.S. foreign policy.

The FPA Annual Awards Dinner presents an opportunity to honor individuals for their work in the foreign policy process and release findings from the FPA Task Force on Climate Change – continuing the FPA’s 97-year history as a catalyst for developing awareness and understanding of U.S. foreign policy and global issues.

About the Foreign Policy Association

Founded in 1918, the mission of the Foreign Policy Association today, as it has been throughout its 97-year history, is to serve as a catalyst for developing awareness, understanding and informed opinion on U.S. foreign policy and global issues. Through its balanced, nonpartisan publications and programs, FPA encourages citizens to participate in the foreign policy process. To learn more about the Foreign Policy Association, please visit http://www.fpa.org.

About The Moore Charitable Foundation

Louis Bacon is President of The Moore Charitable Foundation Inc. (MCF) and chairman of its affiliate foundations. Founded by Bacon in 1992, MCF supports conservation nonprofits that focus on protecting threatened landscapes, habitats and water bodies. MCF also supports educational and community programs in specific geographic priority areas.

http://www.thebahamasweekly.com/publish/international/Louis_Bacon_Lee_C_Bollinger_and_Alan_Gilbert_Honored_with_Foreign_Policy_Association_Medals42145.shtml

Louis Bacon donates $1.5m to support African American History

The Moore Charitable Foundation Pledges $1.5 Million to the National Museum of African American History and Culture.

The Donation Will Support “The Power of Place” Exhibition

The Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture received a $1.5 million donation from Louis Moore Bacon’s Moore Charitable Foundation. The museum is expected to open in fall 2016. The gift will directly support “The Power of Place,” one of the museum’s inaugural exhibitions, a portion of which explores the origin of rice cultivation along the southeastern seaboard of the United States.

“The power of place is an important theme in the history and culture of African Americans, and we are proud to have the support of the Moore Charitable Foundation as we come closer to completing our home on the National Mall,” said Lonnie G. Bunch III, founding director of the museum. “This donation builds momentum and adds a new level of anticipation as we seek to tell America’s story through the lens of the African American experience.”

The exhibit about the rice fields of South Carolina’s low country will be located within “The Power of Place” exhibition. Enslaved Africans and African Americans cultivated rice along the southeastern seaboard of the United State for hundreds of years. The transformation of the landscape along this coast is a story of great creativity and cruel coercion, in which the culture, knowledge and skills that enslaved people brought with them from Africa played formative roles. The reverberations of this process continue to shape the region’s environment, culture and social life.

“It is crucial to preserve the stories of the rice fields of the low country because they hold important lessons for today,” said Louis Moore Bacon, founder and chairman of the Moore Charitable Foundation. “We hope this exhibition will encourage people of all ages to learn about the significance of these places and value our shared history.”

Bacon is a direct descendent of Roger Moore, the original 18th-century owner of Orton Plantation, the northernmost rice plantation in the low country. As the owner of Orton Plantation Holdings, Bacon is the driving force behind efforts to re-establish heirloom agricultural production on those lands. Orton Plantation Holdings purchased the plantation home and tracts of surrounding forest in November 2010, and Bacon soon initiated environmental restoration and historical preservation efforts.

Many acres of rice fields have been lost over the years due to storm erosion and wave action from ships, but ongoing work to renew Orton’s fields will preserve the historic use of the land and maintain a key link to America’s past. Recent archaeological excavation efforts at Orton Plantation revealed for the first time the remains of the lost Kendal Plantation, a site originally founded in the 1720s by Roger Moore. The site is also a testament to the heartache, sacrifice and accomplishment of all enslaved African Americans.

About the Museum

The National Museum of African American History and Culture was established by an Act of Congress through legislation signed into law in 2003 by President George W. Bush. Scheduled to open in 2016, the museum is under construction on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., on a five-acre tract adjacent to the Washington Monument. Upon completion, NMAAHC will become the nation’s largest and most comprehensive cultural institution devoted exclusively to exploring and documenting the African American story and its impact on American history. For more information, visit the museum’s website at nmaahc.si.edu.

About the More Charitable Foundation

Louis Bacon is the chairman of the Moore Charitable Foundation Inc. (MCF) and its affiliate foundations. Founded by Bacon in 1992, MCF supports conservation nonprofits that focus on protecting threatened landscapes, habitats and water bodies. MCF also supports educational and community programs in specific geographic priority areas.

BREEF hires new environmental educator with a grant from The Moore Bahamas Foundation

“The Bahamas Reef Environment Educational Foundation (BREEF) announced April 23 a grant from The Moore Bahamas Foundation (MBF) to hire Ms Chantal Curtis as its new Environmental Educator. Her combined experiences in teaching and forensic science make her a valuable asset to the BREEF team as it seeks to expand citizen science leadership in its coastal field studies and underwater activities.

The latest staff expansion comes as BREEF continues to successfully lead local marine conservation efforts around The Bahamas. BREEF’s education initiatives provide public and private school children with hands-on opportunities to learn about the Bahamian marine environment. The new environmental educator position and many ongoing education programmes are made possible by grants from MBF, local affiliate of The Moore Charitable Foundation founded by Louis Bacon in 1992.

“BREEF is proud to add a uniquely qualified environmental educator to work with the thousands of children participating in our field trips to marine and coastal ecosystems, thanks to the continued commitment from our long-standing partner, The Moore Bahamas Foundation,” said Casuarina McKinney-Lambert, Executive Director of Bahamas Reef Environment Educational Foundation. “We continue to realize our mission by providing students of different ages and backgrounds the opportunity to learn more about why marine conservation is important and to see how we can work together for positive change.”

Efforts to educate future generations about the vital Bahamian marine environment range from summer sea camps, with activities such as snorkeling, to outreach and education about sharks in The Bahamas, to virtual coral reef field trips. Additionally, BREEF’s marine conservation workshops have trained over 700 teachers from islands across The Bahamas. These educators are now back in their classrooms sharing what they learned with their students and colleagues.

Louis Bacon, Founder of The Moore Charitable Foundation. (Photo by Yann Dandois)Throughout the year, BREEF offers classroom presentations and field trips for school groups to enhance instruction of marine conservation topics now included in national curricula. In 2014, BREEF programs allowed over 2,000 of students to experience the marine environment of The Bahamas. As demand for field trips has increased in recent years, support from The Moore Bahamas Foundation has allowed more students to enjoy this opportunity annually.

“The high demand for BREEF field trips highlights the fact that Bahamian students care about their environment and they value experiences that create an emotional connection to the water, plants and wildlife around them,” said Ann Colley, Executive Director and Vice President of The Moore Bahamas Foundation. “We are grateful for the opportunity to work with BREEF and support these one-of-a-kind learning experiences for the children of The Bahamas, and we know that Chantal Curtis will be a vital part of this good work.”

The hands-on learning approach that BREEF emphasizes is also showcased through the Bahamas Environmental Steward (BES) Scholars youth mentorship programme. In collaboration with The Cape Eleuthera Island School, BREEF provides BES Scholars with the unique opportunity to become involved in marine research, including shark and turtle tagging activities.

In recent years BREEF has been able to expand and enhance its marine science and field studies programmes, while also diversifying options for students at both public and private schools. In 2009, BREEF launched the Eco-Schools (Bahamas) Programme. Eco-Schools is the largest sustainable schools programme in the world, operating in over 55 countries.

The Moore Bahamas Foundation and BREEF’s successful partnership began in 2000, and most recently, MBF commended BREEF’s campaign that helped influence new legislation that ensures a fixed closed fishing season for the endangered Nassau grouper.

BREEF Eco-Summit, 70 young environmental leaders learning and sharing about conservation.“When we see the joy and wonder on the faces of the students in our programmes, we know that we are doing meaningful work for the future of The Bahamas and our precious waters,” McKinney-Lambert said. “We are excited to welcome Ms Curtis to BREEF and we look forward to expanding our education efforts and continuing to promote the much needed conservation of our Bahamian marine environment.”

Chantal Curtis will be coordinating and implementing coastal field trips to Jaws Beach, Bonefish pond and other key places around the island as part of ongoing National Coastal Awareness Month activities. She will also collaborate with Dr Demian Chapman and Mr Mark Bond for shark education in May. Chantal first got involved with BREEF as a Teacher Training Workshop participant in 2014.

This summer, the BREEF team will be particularly busy with summer sea camps on New Providence, Eleuthera, and San Salvador, and with a Marine Conservation Teacher Training Workshop on San Salvador.”

Source: http://www.bahamaislandsinfo.com

Allegations of Nygard ‘smear campaign’ make sense of strange reports

This week, news broke of a lawsuit filed by Bahamian resident and conservationist Louis Bacon, alleging that his neighbor Peter Nygard orchestrated a ‘smear campaign’ against him.

As reported by the New York Post:

In one instance, Bacon accuses Nygard of doctoring an October 2011 CBS News report about the arrest of Wall Street titan Rajat Gupta for insider trading. The doctored video superimposed Bacon’s name and face over Gupta’s, falsely alleging that Bacon was at the center of a “billion-dollar scam,” according to the suit.

Elsewhere, the suit cites a flurry of speculation in local Bahamian media after Bacon’s house manager, Dan Tuckfield, died in the billionaire’s pool in May 2010. While official reports cited a heart attack, Nygard used local media to spread rumors about a murder and cover-up by Bacon, the suit claims.

“Louis Bacon filed this lawsuit to hold Peter Nygard and his companies responsible for their unlawful and reprehensible smear campaign,” Bacon’s attorney, Orin Snyder, said in a statement. “We look forward to our day in court.”

The revelation of this lawsuit into the open press appears to make sense of a number of strange reports recently circulating in the Bahamian press featuring these prominent citizens.

The Bahamas Citizen, for example, recently reported that the Save The Bays environmental group, which is committed to preserve and protect the Bahamian environment, was disrupted by a “paid-for mob”.

References to this event are amongst those apparently contained in the claims.

Save the Bays

Save The Bays is a licensed non-profit organization comprised of Bahamian and international members united in their commitment to preserve and protect the Bahamian environment through proactive policy change, education, legal action and advocacy.

Particular emphasis is given to encouraging effective land-use decisions and habitat restoration efforts that benefit the natural and human communities of Clifton Bay.

Read more here: www.savethebays.bs

Save The Bays environmental group disrupted by “paid-for mob”

Two directors of Save The Bays, the environmental advocacy group, have asked for police protection after a rally in support of a Freedom of Information Act was disrupted on Friday night in downtown Nassau by what they claim was “a bought and paid-for mob”.

Fred Smith and Joseph Darville said last night in a statement that they fear for their lives after allegedly being targeted by aggressive groups of young men holding menacing and defamatory banners bearing their names and faces.

The rally, in Charlotte Street, was held in conjunction with a number of community partners, including the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce. “What happened on Friday night was disgusting,” Mr Smith said. “A peaceful gathering in support of freedom of information was nearly hijacked by a bought and paid-for mob sent there to intimidate and cause trouble.”

Mr Smith claimed it was not the first time this had happened. “Considering the increasingly sinister tone of their messages, many of us are now very afraid. We call on the Commissioner of Police to intervene and protect us before someone gets hurt.”

According to Mr Darville, a group of men, on a flatbed truck blaring music, arrived carrying banners but were turned away by a senior police officer. However, they returned and the Save the Bays director confronted them.

“I pointed to my own face on their banners, and told them there is no way they could know what we stood for and be there protesting against us,” he said. “In the end, these young men admitted they had no idea what it was all about. Many of them dropped their signs, even before police again asked them to leave.”

Mr Darville said some of the men claimed to have been asked to attend the protest by individuals working for fashion designer Peter Nygard, who has a long-running dispute with his neighbour, Louis Bacon, a Save The Bays supporter for which Mr Smith is the lawyer. Some wore shirts and others waved placards bearing slogans about Mr Bacon. At one point, star Bahamian boxer Taureano Johnson appeared at the scene.

Friday night police confirmed that the men had no permit to protest.

http://tribune242.com/news/2014/dec/08/plea-police-protection-after-mob-interrupts-protes